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Swedish semmel mud cake
Swedish semmel mud cake
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A Swedish semla is a cardamom bun filled with almond paste and whip cream. This recipe is a mix of a semla and a blond mud cake. This slightly sticky mud cake is topped like a semla, with almond paste and sweet whip cream. So why not give it a try and impress your friends or family on the actual semmel day that accrues in February, the day before Ash Wednesday.

Ingredient List for 10 servings:
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180 gr Almond flour
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85 gr Almond paste
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1 teaspoon Cardamom powder
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150 gr Margarine
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120 gr Flour
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150 gr Sugar
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3 Eggs
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2 teaspoons Vanilla sugar
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1 pinch Salt

Button Topping
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250 gr Almond paste
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300 ml Whip cream
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2 teaspoons Vanilla sugar

Oven temperature:
175 degrees Celsius
Instructions:
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Preheat the oven at 175 degrees Celsius.
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Start by making the cake. In a bowl mix together the dry ingredients for the cake. Add the eggs and grated almond paste and stir together.
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Melt the butter and mix it with the batter.
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Butter a round baking form with removable edges. Pour the batter in and bake in the middle of the oven for 20 minutes.
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Take out the cake and let it cool down in room temperature.
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Time to make the topping by grate the almond paste.
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Mix 2 tablespoons of the fluid whip cream together with almost all the grated almond paste. Spread evenly on top of the cake.
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Whip the cream and place evenly on the cake.
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Spread the left over grated almond paste on top of the cake as decoration.
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